Environment and natural resources

Forest protection NGOs

The protection of Cambodian forests is primarily the responsibility of the Ministry of Agriculture, Forests and Fisheries (MAFF) and the Ministry of Environment. There are, however, many non-governmental organizations (NGOs) working in the area, from United Nations (UN) agencies and other global bodies to locally-registered ...

Animals

Cambodian animals are state property under Article 48 of the Forestry Law of 2002. This places the Forestry Administration (FA) in charge of research programs and conservation duties. The FA carries this out through its Department of Wildlife and Biodiversity. Conservation programs in the field ...

Plants

Although there are often new discoveries,1 a global lack of up to date data on botanical research makes plants biodiversity hard to assess in Cambodia. Compared to neighboring countries, the number of plant species is low, mostly due to the relative country’s flat landscape.2 Botanical knowledge ...

Biodiversity

Biodiversity​ or​ Biological​ Resources:​ Various​ organisms​ in​ the​ same​ or​ different​ species​ and​ living​ organisms​ of​ all​ levels​ and​ sources,​ including​ land,​ marine​ and​ freshwater​ ecosystems,​ and​ the​ ecological​ relationships​ in​ which​ these​ ecosystems​ exist.​1​​ Biodiversity is essential for most of the resources used by ...

Ground water

Cambodia relies heavily on its groundwater resources to overcome water shortages during the dry season. More than half of the population depends on it when enough surface water is not available. At a certain depth, the ground is saturated with water, and the upper surface ...

Rivers and lakes

Tonle Sap lake reflections. Photo from Mariusz Kluzniak. Uploaded on 1 January 2012. Licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0Despite severe droughts striking the country frequently, Cambodia possesses substantial water resources, mostly contained in the Mekong River and the Tonle Sap great lake and river. The lake ...

Water policy and administration

In Cambodia, alternate periods of drought and heavy rains bring challenges for water management. The current trends show increasing annual rainfall and temperature throughout Cambodia, with a likelihood that both flooding and droughts will increase in frequency, severity and duration1. Water management involves issues of ...

Marine and coastal areas

In terms of attractiveness, one of Cambodia’s assets is the relative absence of intense development along its coasts, in comparison with neighboring countries. The 440 kilometer-long coastline includes a large area of non-urbanized zones, where locals can make their livelihoods from coastal resources. Cambodia’s coastline ...

Forest policy and administration

Logging truck in Mondulkiri protected forest , Cambodia. Photo by Global Water Forum, taken on 23 February 2014. Licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0Cambodia is deeply concerned about deforestation. While the country seeks fast economic development, forests represent a tremendous national treasure. In order to help ...

Air pollution

The smoke and stench blow into the air in Phnom Penh’s huge landfill. Photo by Alan Morgan, taken on 17 September 2011. Licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0Air pollution originates mainly from the burning of fuels such as petroleum, diesel and coal in the transport, household, ...

Water pollution

Young child drinks clean water in Cambodia. Photo by Cecilia Snyder, taken on 12 July 2003. Licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0Water pollution can be defined in many different ways. Basically, it is the contamination of water when pollutants are discharged into water bodies without treatment ...

Solid waste

A landfill site in Battambang province, Cambodia. Photo by freshheadfilms, taken on 6 January 2005. Licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0In Cambodia, burning waste remains a common practice, particularly in rural areas, due to the lack of dumpsites or waste collection services. It is still considered ...

Adaptation

UN’s Bali Climate Change Conference. Photo by Oxfam International, taken on 4 December 2007. Licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0Climate change is a continuing problem. In Southeast Asia, Cambodia is one of the countries that is most affected and underprepared. As it is a developing country, ...

Terms and definitions

Defining and measuring forests is not an easy business. Definitions that initially sound very similar can turn out to have crucial differences. Understanding the terms is important for understanding forest use, forest cover, forest laws and policies and deforestation. ...

Protected areas

As Cambodia emerged from years of conflict, pressures grew on natural resources and sensitive areas. In response, a number of protected areas were created by royal decree in 1993 to protect ecologically and culturally important places. More detailed guidelines on managing the country’s protected areas ...

Protected forest

Protected Forests are generally established under individual sub-decrees, specifically for the purpose of protecting biodiversity and conservation. They are home to many endangered or threatened species. ...

Forest classifications

The classification of forests is set out in the Law on Forestry 2002. The law applies to both natural forests and plantations, and “defines the framework for management, harvesting, use, development and conservation of the forests in the Kingdom of Cambodia. The objective of this ...

Forest cover

Cambodian forest cover has reduced dramatically in recent decades. In 1973 there were 13.1 million hectares of total forest, but by 2014 the total cover had fallen to 8.7 million hectares. ...

National parks and wildlife sanctuaries

Cambodia’s national parks (or ‘natural parks’) and wildlife preserves were established under the 1993 Royal Decree on the Protection of Natural Areas. Although other areas have been added subsequently, there is currently no officially available list of all protected areas and their boundaries. ...

Forest cover reporting

Forest cover is the area of land covered by tree canopy. Measuring and reporting this can show the different types of forest that exist and the areas of each, and how these areas change over time. ...

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